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Alan Gallay

 

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Lyndon B. Johnson Chair of U.S. History

Early America, Atlantic World, U.S. South, Native America

Reed 303
(817) 257-6299
a.gallay@tcu.edu

Alan Gallay teaches and researches in the fields of Early American and Atlantic World History.  He received his B.A. from the University of Florida, and the M.A. and Ph.D. from Georgetown University.  He has taught at several universities, including Notre Dame, Mississippi, Western Washington, Harvard, Auckland (New Zealand), and most recently, Ohio State, where he held the Warner R. Woodring Chair in Atlantic World and Early American history, and served as director of The Center for Historical Research.

A frequent public speaker, Gallay has given talks around the world at universities, museums, and other public venues, including thrice on board ship as a Smithsonian Institution lecturer and study leader.  Locales have ranged from Tasmania to Istanbul, and from Seville to Edinburgh, and to dozens of other places in the United States. 

Gallay has published numerous essays and books.  His most recent books are Colonial and Revolutionary America (Prentice Hall, 2010) and an edited volume, Indian Slavery in Colonial America (Nebraska, 2009), a Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title.  His best known book, The Indian Slave Trade:  The Rise of the English Empire in the American South, 1670-1717 (Yale, 2002), received the Bancroft Prize, the Washington State Book Award, and other accolades, including selection by Library Journal  as one of the ten most important books on American Indians in any discipline published over the previous thirty years.  

Gallay’s current research project is for a book titled, “Ralegh and the Origins of English Colonialism . . . in Ireland and the Americas.”  This work examines the convergence of religious, economic, political, military, cultural, and scientific forces that led England to colonize overseas in the 16th century.

Alan Gallay CV